Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD

Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD

[types usermeta='affiliation' user_is_author='true'][/types]

[types usermeta='location' user_is_author='true'][/types]

Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD, is a Professor of Radiology at the Nijmegen Medical Center of Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. He is an internationally recognized researcher known for developing, validating, and implementing new MRI techniques in oncology. He is also the Chair of the Prostate MR-Reference Center, Founding Member and Past-President of the International Cancer Imaging Society, and Past-President of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR). In 1980, he earned his MD from Utrecht University. In 1990, he earned his PhD in medical research on MRI of the urinary bladder from Radboud University Nijmegen. Since then, he has contributed to almost 300 peer-reviewed publications. One of his notable contributions involves initiating PI-RADS and, along with ESUR and the American College of Radiology, making the system a world standard, thereby enabling early selective detection of aggressive prostate cancer. Also, he helped revive Combidex-MRI, which can detect 1.5 mm lymph node metastases of any cancer. He has been decorated as a “Knight in the Order of the Dutch Lion.” In addition, he has been awarded the Wertheim Salomonson Medal, the SAR Lifetime Achievement Award, the Dutch Cancer Society’s Queen Wilhelmina Research Award, and the SCBTMR Lauterbur Award.

Articles by Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD

Multiparametric MRI for the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD, Professor of Radiology at the Nijmegen Medical Center of Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, discusses the ins and outs of diagnosing clinically significant prostate cancer (csPC) using mpMRI. He goes on to discuss how to improve the diagnostic accuracy of mpMRI, including optimizing image acquisition, use of training sessions to refine the radiologist’s expertise and interpretation of results, as well as how to reduce systematic and random error associated with MRI-directed biopsy.

Read More

The Capacity of MRI to Predict Extracapsular Disease

Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD, Professor of Radiology at the Nijmegen Medical Center of Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, discusses the capacity of MRIs to predict extracapsular disease. He notes that this is not a perfect technology and it is not possible to predict with one hundred percent accuracy, but he emphasizes how it can be useful for staging. He also discusses when it is necessary to wait and how long to wait after a biopsy for a staging MRI. Lastly, he covers situations where it is not necessary to wait for an MRI.

Read More

Are MRI Fusion Biopsies Necessary for Urologists?

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology, interviews Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD, Professor of Radiology at the University in Nijmegen in the Netherlands, about prostate cancer suspicions and which metrics define prostate cancer risk. Dr. Barentsz discusses the steps that must be taken if there is a suspicion of prostate cancer and emphasizes the importance that MRIs and molecular markers play in this. He notes that in an optimal world with a perfect MRI a molecular marker test is often unnecessary, but that sometimes we do not have perfect MRIs, and in these cases, molecular marker tests like SelectMDX are good tests to use. However, MRIs offer more information about potential cancer and are also better at excluding more significant cancers than molecular marker tests. Dr. Crawford and Dr. Barentsz come to the conclusion that which is better or necessary often depends on the country the patient resides in.

Read More

What Does Suspicion for Prostate Cancer Mean, and What Metric Defines Prostate Cancer Risk?

E. David Crawford, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Grand Rounds in Urology, interviews Jelle Barentsz, MD, PhD, Professor of Radiology at the University in Nijmegen in the Netherlands, about prostate cancer suspicions and which metrics define prostate cancer risk. Dr. Barentsz discusses the steps that must be taken if there is a suspicion of prostate cancer and emphasizes the importance that MRIs and molecular markers play in this. He notes that in an optimal world with a perfect MRI a molecular marker test is often unnecessary, but that sometimes we do not have perfect MRIs, and in these cases, molecular marker tests like SelectMDX are good tests to use. However, MRIs offer more information about potential cancer and are also better at excluding more significant cancers than molecular marker tests. Dr. Crawford and Dr. Barentsz come to the conclusion that which is better or necessary often depends on the country the patient resides in.

Read More

Join the GRU Community

- Why Join? -